What are the best knots for fly fishing?


Hey Guys! I thought today we would discuss KNOTS! This is a great topic for anyone wanting to either get into fly fishing or prehaps wants to just go over knots and needs a little refresh.

In this article, we are going to look at a selection of knots used all over the world by fly anglers. Many of these knots are in actuality general purpose knots however some are more specific to fly fishing.  Let's specify a little, these knots that I will show you are what we use for trout fishing, nymph and dry. Please remember that other types of fishing will require different knots.

What are The Best knots for fly fishing? Well, this might sound silly but these are actually the knots that you know well and are confident with. So taking a pice of line, leader, or backing and just practicing the heck out of them at home will get you to the place you want to be when you are on the water. That way when you need to tie your knot its a quick simple and effortless thing.

This is our selection of knots but remember there are plenty out there so don't feel you have to stick to these. So Here is our selection of favorite knots starting from right at the back.

Backing Knot.

This is the first item you will need to deal with when setting up your gear on an empty reel. If you hook on a big fish that rips your line out this backing line needs to be well secured.

THE ARBOR KNOT

 

Fly Line to Backing

Next up is a knot that is used to tie fly line to backing, This is really an excellent knot, not only it's a beautiful knot, clean. You can also use this to tie Fly Line to tapered leaders I prefer it personally to the nail knot.

THE ALBRIGHT KNOT

 

Fly Line to Tapered Leader

Next up is a vital knot, get this right and you will save yourself a lot of hassle when it comes to getting your line out, this has to be durable and clean and preferably offer a minimum amount of extrusion that way when the line is slipping through the eyes on the rod, it will not get caught up all the time, a great knot for bigger heavy-duty streamer setups is the Albright knot or nail knot. but if you are trout fishing this clean method, all be it a little tricky is the way to go. This is a neat variation on the nail knot, al be it a but a little tricky. this knot is great for dry fly fishing as the tension in the cast travels unanimously through the line. If you have a looped fly line and you will be fishing with bobbers or strike indicators, this is not for you. 

THE NEEDLE KNOT

 

Leader To tippet

We have to great Knotts here, both are very functional and work very well, however, the first knot, the surgeon's loop is great if you have broken a fly off and for making tag ends however it is not so great when mending tippet with flys still on the end. as you will have to pass the flys through the loops. However, this is a very quick knot. so with the exception of being on the water and having flys already on the line the surgeon's loop is my first port of call. The other knot the blood knot is a very strong exception knot that I use for fitting indicators, (euro nymphing indicators) joining tippet when I have flies already on the other end (birds nest situations) and for joining custom made tapered leaders.

THE SURGEONS LOOP

THE BLOOD KNOT

 

Tippet to Fly

Finally, we have a tippet to fly knot. Now, this really depends on what flies and what circumstance. strictly speaking for tying dry flies and small nymphs we use the improved clinch knot. This is great and fast. Why the improved clinch over the classic clinch? Well, on smaller tippets the improved clinch will knot slip off.....EVER!

THE IMPROVED CLINCH KNOT

And there you have it. I hope you found this article useful. 

 FROM YOUR FRIENDS @ WHIELDON FLY FISHING

Made for fly fishing, born to fly fish. We strive to share our passion for fly fishing through our unique products range, videos, blog, and one of a kind fishing Holidays to Lake Como.


1 comment


  • James Rea

    Fantastic insight to a beginner and also a couple of knots I’d never heard of!


Leave a comment


Please note, comments must be approved before they are published